http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/04/140424-tsetse-fly-genome-sequenced-sleeping-sickness-science/

Scientists may next be able to exploit the deadly fly's live birth and mammalian-like milk in battle against sleeping sickness.
 
 

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/04/140424-superbright-supernova-gravitational-lens-science/

Astronomers have struggled to explain why a distant supernova was way too bright. Now, one team has figured it out.
 
 
24 April 2014 @ 07:39 pm

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/04/140424-everest-sherpas-tibet-china-avalanche-climbing/

The deadly avalanche on the Nepali side of Mount Everest hasn't stopped expeditions from China.
 
 
24 April 2014 @ 12:36 pm
I'm trying to find an SF (or fantasy, depending on how you define such things) story I read long ago that claims that any group of people falls silent at 20 after the hour. The narrator theorizes that people are listening for something, and the final line of the story (without major spoilers) has the listeners being rewarded. I believe I read this in an SF anthology, but I can't remember which one. My guess is that this dates from the 1950s or 1960s. It's the sort of thing Theodore Sturgeon would write, but that doesn't mean he wrote this one.

The idea of the story is that people have been, without knowing it, waiting for the voice of some deity. And the last line of the story has a voice coming from nowhere (at 20 minutes after the hour, naturally), saying something like, "And now, my good children, I have come home."


Note that there's an entry on Snopes about the superstition of groups of people falling silent at 20 after the hour having to do with Lincoln's death. This may have been the inspiration for the story, but is otherwise unrelated.
 
 

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/04/140424-pterodactyl-pterosaur-china-oldest-science-animals/

The 163-million-year-old Kryptodrakon pushes back the evolution of the ancient flying reptiles by five million years, a new study says.
 
 
24 April 2014 @ 08:38 am
What Now, I Want to Be the Kitty, and Dog-Eared by Patrick McDonnell

Three collections of Mutts cartoons, humorous, some stand-alone, some stories, and some variations on a theme.

Read more...Collapse )
 
 
 
The book i read in grade 7 was something about magic. Where a boy was raised in a family but it wasn't his real family. His real family was from some magical realm or something. And both his father and mother were powerful and well known but had somehow died. So later in the book he gets magical powers. He also meets a goth chick half way in the book and she acts like his girlfriend. That's all i remember of that book but i know it had a sequel. And that the cover of the book had the main guy riding a horse with 2 other people on each side also accompanied with a horse. i really want to read this book again, but i just cant remember the name or author. please help, thank you.
 
 
23 April 2014 @ 10:52 pm
Spellbound, by Larry Correia  
In the second book in the Grimnoir Chronicles, the U.S. government is the enemy and the author gets his digs in on FDR.


Spellbound

Baen, 2011, 448 pages



Dark fantasy goes hardboiled in Book II of the hard-hitting Grimnoir Chronicles by the New York Times best-selling creator of Monster Hunter International. The Grimnoir Society’s mission is to protect people with magic, and they’ve done so—successfully and in secret—since the mysterious arrival of the Power in the 1850s, but when a magical assassin makes an attempt on the life of President Franklin Roosevelt, the crime is pinned on the Grimnoir. The knights must become fugitives while they attempt to discover who framed them. Things go from bad to worse when Jake Sullivan, former P.I. and knight of the Grimnoir, receives a telephone call from a dead man—a man he helped kill. Turns out the Power jumped universes because it was fleeing from a predator that eats magic and leaves destroyed worlds in its wake. That predator has just landed on Earth.


Correia's allegories are none too subtle, nor is his writing, but this is still damn entertaining.




My complete list of book reviews.
 
 
I'm looking for a short chapter book that I read in Canada in about 1995; my little brother had borrowed a copy from a library. It had some text and very bright, cartoonish illustrations.

It's about a kindergarten boy who finds a container of bubble-blowing solution on the way to school and takes it with him. He's forgotten that it's show-and-tell day, so when called upon to show-and-tell something, he pulls out the bubble solution and blows a bubble. It gets to be an enormous size and then goes and totally envelops the teacher and lifts her out the window. He blows more bubbles and those surround the boy and his classmates, and they have a short adventure travelling through the skies. As I recall, there's a near encounter with an airplane, but everyone returns to the ground safely.

Thanks for any help you can provide!

Found! Looks like Show and Tell by Elvira Woodruff. Thanks to nanichloe!